Here’s What Happened To The Stars Of The Sound Of Music

Is there a musical more beloved than The Sound of Music? Probably not. And even if you’ve not watched the classic flick in years, you’ll remember its iconic tunes – enough to participate in an audience singalong showing should you choose. Altogether now, “How do you solve a problem like Maria…”

Did we catch you humming along? We won’t tell… And you wouldn’t be alone in secretly harboring a love for the 1965 movie. Some of the critics at the Academy liked it, too. The Sound of Music ended up winning five Oscars for Best Music, Best Sound, Best Film Editing and Best Director for Robert Wise. Oh, and that all-important Best Picture gong to top it off. Not only that, but it made $110 million at the box office as well. Adjusted for inflation, that actually makes it the third-highest-grossing movie ever.

But on paper, The Sound of Music’s story doesn’t sound like a laugh riot. It’s based, of course, on the true tale of the von Trapp family and their nanny Maria. They all lived in Austria but had to flee under difficult circumstances when World War II broke out. Needless to say, the movie’s not actually historically accurate, but it makes up for that by being both entertaining and uplifting.

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And The Sound of Music not only saved 20th Century Fox – which was in dire financial straits at the time – but it also made its location of Salzburg, Austria, a tourist destination. What else? Well, it created an army of diehard fans of course. Some of the folks are even people who appeared in the film! So, what happened to that fabulous cast after they left the hills behind? Let’s see.

Julie Andrews

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Although The Sound of Music helped catapult a young Julie Andrews to fame, she was unsure about taking the role of Maria at first. In particular, Andrews feared that her character was too similar to another one she was playing in a teeny little movie called Mary Poppins. But we have her agent Arthur Park to thank for insisting that she take the role. And the rest, as they say, is history.

However, Andrews may have been regretting her choice to begin with. It wasn’t a glamorous shoot, you see. Those famous hills? To actually reach them, Andrews had to ride on ox-drawn carts in the mud. And there were obviously no bathroom facilities up there, meaning everyone had to pee out in the open. Ew! But it all paid off for Andrews, as The Sound of Music made its leading lady a cinematic icon.

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And the actress is still much beloved today. Younger generations probably know her best from the Princess Diaries franchise, where she plays the Queen of Genovia. More recently, she’s been the voice of Lady Whistledown in the period drama Bridgerton. We can probably assume, then, that she never has to pee in the woods anymore…

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Christopher Plummer

The Sound of Music without Christopher Plummer? Perish the thought! But that may have come to pass, as the veteran actor actually hated the movie’s script. In 2011 he told The Hollywood Reporter that he had found the screenplay “so awful and sentimental and gooey. You had to work terribly hard to try and infuse some minuscule bit of humor into it.”

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Mind you, Plummer did also say that he found the finished product “a very good picture [for] what it is.” And that’s just as well, as Captain von Trapp was arguably his most famous role. Yep, while the star was in many acclaimed movies during his long career – and even won an Oscar in 2011 for Beginners – he’ll forever be known as the Captain.

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Naturally, there were plenty of Sound of Music mentions in the obituaries for the beloved actor, who passed away in February 2021. And Julie Andrews, who had remained Plummer’s friend for many years, paid a very touching tribute to her former co-star. She said in a statement, “I treasure the memories of our work together and all the humor and fun we shared through the years. My heart and condolences go out to [Plummer’s] lovely wife Elaine and his daughter Amanda. The world has lost a consummate actor today, and I have lost a cherished friend.”

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Charmian Carr

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Remember Liesel singing that she was “16 going on 17”? In actual fact, Charmian Carr was 22 when filming started! She also had a crush on Christopher Plummer, who was 35 at the time. Was there any on-set romance? Not quite. Plummer revealed that while he and Carr had flirted, it had never gone any further than that. Considering that he was her on-screen father, that’s probably for the best.

Carr didn’t stay in the acting industry, though. Instead, she got married, had two children and became an interior designer. One of her clients in that business was none other than Michael Jackson, who according to Carr was a big fan of Liesel. And the former actress also wrote two books about her life: the appropriately titled Forever Liesl and Letters to Liesl.

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Sadly, Carr died in 2016 after suffering from dementia. Her Sound of Music siblings paid tribute to their friend in a group statement that read, “Charmian Carr has been a shining light in our lives for more than 50 years. The astonishing beauty that the whole world knew and loved was coupled with an equally beautiful spirit… We will always love her and feel grateful to have been loved by her.”

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Nicholas Hammond

Nicholas Hammond played blond-haired second-oldest von Trapp kid Friedrich. He was 14 years old at the time of filming, and that meant there were a lot of teenage hormones flying around on set. But Hammond only had eyes for the girl who played Liesl. Yep, while Charmian Carr had a crush on Christopher Plummer, Hammond in turn had a crush on her – even though she was much older.

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Of course, nothing happened. In 2015 Hammond told the Daily Mail, “We’re all really good friends now, and Charmian and I have a slightly special relationship now.” Unlike Carr, Hammond also stayed in Hollywood. He went on to play Spider-Man in the ’70s TV series based on the character.

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In fact, Hammond is still acting to this day. You may have seen him portraying a demanding version of Sam Wanamaker in 2019 Tarantino film Once Upon a Time… In Hollywood. And that same year, he told Australia’s The Morning Show, “It has been a fun career.” Talk about an understatement!

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Heather Menzies

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The girl who hid spiders in her governess’ bed? That was Louisa von Trapp, who was played by 14-year-old Heather Menzies. And according to the star herself, she had a wonderful time on the Sound of Music set. In 2013 she remembered to Parade, “The whole thing was just a blast… I don’t remember it ever feeling like work at all.”

Perhaps that’s why Menzies continued to act after The Sound of Music’s release. You may remember her from Dragnet, for example, or alongside Gregory Harrison in the television version of Logan’s Run. Sadly, though, Menzies has also seen her fair share of tragedy. In 2002 she lost her husband Robert Ulrich to cancer.

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And while Menzies then devoted herself to helping research into the disease, it ended up claiming her, too. She passed away from brain cancer in 2017 – mere weeks after a diagnosis – at only 68. Her son Ryan Ulrich told Variety, “She was an actress, a ballerina and loved living her life to the fullest.”

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Duane Chase

Child actor Duane Chase played Kurt, the boy who described himself as “incorrigible” to Maria. But it turned out he was incorrigible out of character, too. In 2013 he told Parade, “I did take off at times, totally unannounced to cast, crew and just about anybody else – only to not be there when we had to start filming again. And nobody knew where I was.” Looks like they, um, had to chase him, then!

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Chase also remembered that Julie Andrews would take the kids exploring in their downtime, giving them “an incredible geography experience.” And that seemingly influenced his later life. How? Well, he opted not to continue acting and instead got a master’s degree in geology. These days, he’s a geological software designer and analyst.

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Chase still seems to have an adventurous side, though, as a mountain climber and firefighter with the U.S. Forest Service. He actually sprung back into action when the Californian wildfires hit in 2020, driving supply trucks to help with the rescue efforts. And no prizes for guessing his favorite song from The Sound of Music. As he told Parade, it is, of course, “Climb Every Mountain.”

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Angela Cartwright

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Angela Cartwright was practically a Hollywood veteran when she was cast as Brigitta in The Sound of Music. Well, sort of, as she’d been on The Danny Thomas Show in the ’50s. Thomas even released her from the series to go do the movie – a kind gesture that left Cartwright feeling very grateful.

And Cartwright continued to act after The Sound of Music, taking roles in My Three Sons and Lost in Space. She even popped up in the rebooted Lost in Space Netflix series in 2019 – although in a relatively small role. But perhaps that suits the star fine. Nowadays, she focuses more on her photography instead.

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As for her time on the Sound of Music set? Well, like her on-screen siblings, Cartwright has nothing but good memories. In 2013 she said in an interview with the blog Classic Film and TV Café, “Singing and dancing and playing with other kids while running around Salzburg, Austria, with Julie Andrews was a fantastic experience. How could you not enjoy that?” Quite!

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Debbie Turner

Debbie Turner was only eight years old when she was cast as Marta von Trapp, the second-youngest child of the family. Remember how she asked for a pink parasol in one scene? Many years later, a fan actually sent her one, embroidered with “Marta Sound of Music.” That’s the sort of hold the movie still has on people.

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But like many child actors before and after her, Turner didn’t stay in show business. First, she tried a bit of competitive skiing. Then she juggled raising four children while running a still-successful design business. Hats off to her, as that’s not easy! Turner has even created artwork based on The Sound of Music itself.

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Yep, the former actress made the news in 2020 when she launched a selection of Sound of Music-themed face masks. Adorably, they’re patterned after the clothes Maria created for the children out of her cushions. And you won’t be surprised to hear that the covetable accessories sold like hot cakes.

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Kym Karath

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The honor of playing Gretl – the youngest, cutest von Trapp child – fell to Kym Karath. But she may have been the only one of the siblings who didn’t always enjoy her experience on set. As Julie Andrews recalled in her book Home Work: A Memoir of My Hollywood Years, Karath had plunged into the water during the boat scene and had had to be rescued.

No wonder, then, that Karath reportedly still has a fear of water. But, luckily, that hair-raising brush with death didn’t put her off Hollywood. After The Sound of Music, she became a TV star, taking on roles in Lassie and The Brady Bunch among other classic series. Just like her on-screen sister Angela Cartwright, she also appeared in Lost in Space.

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But Karath eventually gave up acting and moved to Paris to study art. She also married a man named Philippe L’Equilbec and had a son with him. And while she teased a return to the screen in 2005, there’s been no sign of that yet. Based on her Instagram account, though, she seems to have a perfectly happy life regardless.

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Eleanor Parker

The Sound of Music’s Baroness would turn out to be Eleanor Parker’s most enduring role. And even though Elsa von Schraeder is a bit of an ice queen and a villain in the movie, she still has her fans. That’s largely down to Parker’s pitch-perfect performance – not to mention some truly fabulous dresses.

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And Parker kept acting long after The Sound of Music was done. During the ’60s, she starred in the show Bracken’s World, netting a Golden Globe nomination for her standout performance as Sylvia Caldwell. Parker was booked and busy all the way up to the ’90s, in fact. After that, she appeared to retire.

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Then, in 2013, Parker sadly passed away from pneumonia. And you’ll read no finer tribute than the one given by Christopher Plummer following the actress’ death. In a statement, he said, “Eleanor Parker was and is one of the most beautiful ladies I have ever known – both as a person and as a beauty. I hardly believe the sad news, for I was sure she was enchanted and would live forever.” Lovely.

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Richard Haydn

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Richard Haydn was already a well-known character actor when he was cast as Max Detweiler. Even if you didn’t recognize his face, you’d probably remember his voice from the Caterpillar in Disney’s Alice in Wonderland. But perhaps the Sound of Music producers wanted a safe pair of hands, as Max was based upon a real man whose life had to be done justice: Father Franz Wasner.

After that? Haydn was a familiar on-screen face for a long time. You may recall him in Young Frankenstein, The Twilight Zone, The Man From U.N.C.L.E., Bewitched or The Dick Van Dyke Show, to name just a few of his biggest projects. But while Haydn could have become a household name, he didn’t play the game. He disliked the Hollywood system and very rarely gave interviews.

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In fact, upon his death in 1985, Haydn had pretty much cut himself off from the outside world. His film and television legacy lives on, though. And though it may never be confirmed, some people have theorized that he was one of the closeted gay actors of Hollywood’s Golden Age.

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Peggy Wood

Stage actress Peggy Wood was many decades into her venerable career when she played the Reverend Mother Abbess. Despite all that experience, though, she wasn’t so sure about singing. That voice on “Climb Every Mountain”? It actually belongs to the singer Margery McKay. This also explains why Wood stares out of the window so much in the movie – to hide the fact that it’s not her crooning away.

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Yet none of that stopped Wood putting in a stand-out performance that earned her Golden Globe and Oscar nominations. It was a fitting end to her big-screen career, although she continued to do stage work throughout the ’70s. There was a spell on One Life to Live, too.

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Elsewhere, Wood was kept busy with charitable causes and as the president of the American National Theatre and Academy. She served in that prestigious role from 1959 until 1966 – yes, while she was filming The Sound of Music! And after a long and glorious career, Wood finally passed away in 1978 of a cerebral hemorrhage. Both of her husbands had predeceased her, although she was survived by a son.

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Are teenage vampire flicks more your bag, though? Then you can probably quote The Lost Boys by heart. Even today, the ultra-cool black comedy is a gas. That’s thanks in part to its great cast, who elevated what could have been a cheesy horror into a classic. But what became of the film’s stars after they left Santa Carla for good? Let’s find out.

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12. Alex Winter as Marko

Although he had already quit acting, a teenage Alex Winter decided to return to the screen as The Lost Boys’ magnificently mulleted Marko. He even took a break from film school for the gig. But the whole thing was a risk, as Winter wasn’t convinced the movie would be a hit. He explained in the 2019 documentary In Search of Darkness, “It was impossible to see it working. I was like, ‘[This is] not going to work in spades.’”

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Of course, Winter was very, very wrong! The Lost Boys became a huge hit. And two years later, the star returned to acting once again in Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure. With Winters cast as co-lead opposite Keanu Reeves, the film became a classic in its own right – spawning two sequels and a bodacious new form of teen slang.

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Despite this success, Winter became burned out by stardom and eventually took a more permanent break from acting. What did he do instead? He began directing, and he’s since made documentaries on the very varied subjects of file sharing, tax havens and children in Hollywood. Oh, and you may have seen a little sequel called Bill & Ted Face the Music? Winter’s in that, too. Perhaps he still has the acting bug after all.

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11. Billy Wirth as Dwayne

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Joel Schumacher knew he needed someone with just the right amount of sex appeal to play the strong and brooding Dwayne. And, luckily, the director found that in abundance with former model Billy Wirth. In 2020 the filmmaker told Empire, “I thought, ‘I’m gonna put [Wirth] in a motorcycle jacket with no shirt on, and he is gonna be a fabulous Lost Boy.’” Can’t argue with that…

Wirth would prove to be more than just eye candy, though. Following The Lost Boys’ run in theaters, the Brown University alum practically became a jack of all trades as an artist, filmmaker and musician. He even had a stint on American Gladiators in 1989.

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And much like his former co-star Winter, Wirth has been active in the production side of filmmaking – having made his own flick MacArthur Park in 2001. But for all his accomplishments, the actor’s experience on The Lost Boys remains hard to beat. In 2017 he recalled to CherryLosAngeles, “We really did sleep all day, party all night. [It was] a fun time.”

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10. Jason Patric as Michael Emerson

Jason Patric may have been born into a family of actors, but at the time of The Lost Boys’ filming, he was pretty green in Hollywood. Yep, back then, the son of Jason Miller and grandson of Jackie Gleason had only one other theatrically released movie under his belt. But did Patric’s relative inexperience stop him from shining as Michael? Absolutely not!

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To start with, Patric had actually resisted The Lost Boys, as he had a loathing for vampire films. No surprise, then, that he’s since stuck almost exclusively to drama. Some of his later work, for example, includes grittier fare such as Sleepers and Narc. Then again, the actor also starred in the 1997 blockbuster Speed 2: Cruise Control. That’s a flop he’d probably rather forget, as it earned him a Razzie nomination for Worst Actor.

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But Patric’s most dramatic role would actually occur off screen. In 1991 the actor was at the heart of a shocking celebrity scandal when he stole Kiefer Sutherland’s fiancé Julia Roberts just days before the pair’s wedding. Gasp! In the end, though, Patric and Roberts’ relationship lasted just one year. And, luckily, his friendship with Sutherland – who he acted with on stage in 2012 – since appears to have been salvaged.

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9. Jami Gertz as Star

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As the pack’s only female member, Jami Gertz’s Star was the key in recruiting Michael into the Lost Boys. And, fittingly, the actors had a similar influence on each other before filming began. In real life, however, their roles were reversed. Patric and Gertz had worked together previously, and it was actually he who encouraged his co-star to audition for the film.

Schumacher was similarly wowed by Gertz’s screen presence and even tweaked his initial plans for Star in order to fit the actress’ look. But even though she shone in The Lost Boys and later films such as Twister, Gertz would eventually step back from the movie business. In fact, she would start playing in a completely different court altogether.

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What did Gertz end up doing after leaving acting behind? Well, in 2015 she and her husband purchased the NBA’s Atlanta Hawks, and the star now serves as the team’s media ambassador. “If you’re thinking that this is an unusual career change, then don’t worry. You aren’t the only one!” Gertz joked to The Hollywood Reporter in 2018. “It’s not your everyday Hollywood actress tale.”

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8. Brooke McCarter as Paul

Blonde-maned Paul was one of the Lost Boys’ more frightening members – even with the laughable nickname of “Twisted Sister.” But Brooke McCarter himself just wasn’t terrifying enough for Schumacher. The director even slapped the star to get a menacing performance out of him during a pivotal scene. Schumacher confessed to Empire, “It’s outrageous – he should have reported me…” Quite.

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McCarter didn’t end up pressing charges against Schumacher. But maybe the experience made an impact, as he didn’t pursue his acting dreams much further after The Lost Boys. Instead, after a handful of later roles, McCarter focused on composing, music production and filmmaking. He even tried his hand at management, overseeing co-star Corey Haim’s career in the ’90s.

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McCarter ultimately left Hollywood for Tampa, Florida, where he found a job in telecommunications. But between his work and his role as a single parent, he still found time to appear at conventions. His approachable nature made him a favorite with fans, too. That makes it even sadder to hear that McCarter passed away in 2015 from a liver condition. He was just 52.

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7. Edward Hermann as Max

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While the Lost Boys themselves all looked pretty young, their ringleader took on the appearance of a nerdy middle-aged man. All the better to fool people with? Probably, as in a surprise twist, it’s revealed that Max – the nebbish video shop owner – is really the head vampire. But his reign is abruptly brought to an end with – what else? – a stake through the heart.

Before his stint playing Max, Edward Hermann was primarily known for portraying real-life figures on TV – Franklin D. Roosevelt, for instance. That meant he apparently leaped at the chance to portray something different in The Lost Boys. The actor admitted in 2004’s The Lost Boys: A Retrospective, “I was approached with the script, and I read it and thought it was great. You know, anything to get out of a suit and stop playing historical characters.”

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Following The Lost Boys, Hermann would continue acting to great acclaim in film and TV. He even won an Emmy for a 1999 part in The Practice. And, of course, he endeared himself to many as Richard Gilmore in The Gilmore Girls. But this glittering career would come to a sad end in 2014, when Hermann passed away from brain cancer at the age of 71.

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6. Jamison Newlander as Alan Frog

Alongside his brother Edgar, Alan was one of the only crusaders fighting against the undead swarm in Santa Carla. But did you know that his character was originally written as an eight-year-old? Yep, you read that right! It goes without saying that they eventually aged Alan up a little – making the 17-year-old Jamison Newlander a better fit for the part.

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Newlander had originally dreamed of becoming a doctor. In fact, he actually took up acting in order to pay for his tuition fees. But fate would intervene. Schumacher gave a talk at the young star’s acting class, and this would serve him in good stead when he auditioned for The Lost Boys. Then, following his role as Frog, Newlander made another major screen appearance in 1988’s The Blob.

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So, did Newlander ever become a doctor? Nope! He even went so far as to earn a bachelor’s in acting from New York University. From there, he transitioned into writing and directing as well as creating the online user-created soap opera WikisoapTM. But Newlander eventually found himself on the other side of the camera again for 2010’s Lost Boys: The Thirst, which sees Frog join the hordes of the dead.

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5. Barnard Hughes as Grandpa

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Barnard Hughes made his acting debut way back in 1935 – making him undoubtedly The Lost Boys’ most distinguished cast member. Perhaps that’s why the actor – in character as the Emerson brothers’ root beer-loving grandpa – got the film’s ice-cool closing line. Say it with us: “One thing about living in Santa Carla I never could stomach: all the damn vampires.” Nice.

But Hughes’ vast career wasn’t defined by The Lost Boys, of course. Prior to his casting, the star was an incredibly hardworking actor whose resume looks about as long as War and Peace in length. Yes, it’s estimated that Hughes appeared in 400 film, television and stage productions throughout his life. He was awarded handsomely, too, winning a Tony and an Emmy.

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So, where else have we seen Hughes demonstrating his talent? Well, the actor was most recognizable for films such as Midnight Cowboy and Tron prior to his theater work. And although he was already in his seventies at the time of The Lost Boys’ release, he continued to earn roles long after that. Maybe you remember him from Sister Act 2 or the TV series Blossom? In 2006, though, Hughes would pass away at the age of 90.

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4. Dianne Wiest as Lucy Emerson

Plenty of directors make their own fantasy cast lists for their movies, and Schumacher was no different. He was dead set on getting Dianne Wiest in The Lost Boys, although he wasn’t optimistic. You see, the actress had earned an Oscar for her role in Hannah and Her Sisters the previous year. Schumacher assumed, then, that a vampire film wouldn’t appeal to her tastes.

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But much to the filmmaker’s surprise, Wiest was receptive to the idea. And soon enough, Schumacher’s “pipe dream” became a reality when the thespian signed up for the role of the Emerson boys’ mom Lucy. The director admitted on The Lost Boys: A Retrospective, “I couldn’t believe [it] when she said ‘Yes.’ [Wiest] is one of my favorite actresses.” Aww.

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The Lost Boys wouldn’t be Wiest’s only dalliance with the fantasy genre, either. Three years later, she’d star in Edward Scissorhands as a housewife who discovers a strange robotic man living near her neighborhood. Wiest has primarily stuck to prestige pics since, though, and won yet another Academy Award for her performance in 1994’s Bullets Over Broadway.

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3. Corey Haim as Sam Emerson

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Even though he was just a teenager at the time, Corey Haim had a handful of roles under his belt before auditioning for The Lost Boys. And it seemed like earning the role of Sam Emerson was a shoo-in. According to Haim, Schumacher called him by his character’s name upon their first meeting. Talk about a lucky break!

Then, while shooting The Lost Boys, Haim met Corey Feldman. And the teen heartthrobs – known affectionately as “the two Coreys” – went on to have a friendship and successful screen partnership. Feldman recalled to PR.com in 2008, “Whether it be coincidence or some master plan from the studio system, we ended up doing three films back to back.”

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Alas, the duo’s popularity would wane in the following decade. And aside from his A&E documentary The Two Coreys, Haim would work mainly outside the mainstream with roles in shlocky B-movies. He also struggled with addiction issues, although his death at just 38 was ultimately chalked up to pneumonia.

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2. Kiefer Sutherland as David

As the son of Donald Sutherland, Kiefer Sutherland had, well, pretty much a free pass into Hollywood. He even made his first screen appearance alongside his father in 1983’s Max Dugan Returns. But the younger Sutherland would soon step out of his pa’s shadow and emerge as a talent in his own right with roles such as the intimidating Ace in Stand by Me.

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Sutherland soon made an even more menacing impression in The Lost Boys as vampire ringleader David. Inspired by rocker Billy Idol, the actor’s on-screen look lent an iconic physicality to the role – equal parts cool and creepy. Schumacher explained on The Lost Boys: An Introspective, “[Sutherland] has the least amount of dialogue of anyone in the movie, but his presence is extraordinary.” Too true.

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And Sutherland’s presence later shone through in Young Guns, A Few Good Men and Dark City. He also teamed up with Schumacher for four more films – including 1990’s Flatliners. But while Sutherland spent the following decade immersed in moviemaking, it would take a role on television to truly bring him to the next level.

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Debuting on Fox in 2001, 24 was a game-changer for Sutherland. As hard-edged government agent Jack Bauer, the actor became beloved by millions. He racked up countless Golden Globe and Emmy Award nominations in the process, too. And it gets better: his frequent on-screen use of the phrase “Damn it!” even inspired a drinking game.

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Since 24’s final episode in 2014, Sutherland has remained a mainstay of TV through shows such as Designated Survivor and The Fugitive. But what you may not know is that the star has actually rebranded himself as a country music singer. We wonder what a character as rock and roll as David would think about such a career change…

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1. Corey Feldman as Edgar Frog

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Corey Feldman was apparently pushed into acting by his parents. Well, we assume they had something to do with it, as he started working in the industry at the tender age of three. But it wasn’t until his teen years that Feldman really made a name for himself with the hits Gremlins, Stand by Me and The Goonies. And, crucially, it was his work in that last film that led to his casting in The Lost Boys.

Yep, Feldman had a meeting with Schumacher at the suggestion of The Goonies’ director Richard Donner. The result? The young actor became gung-ho vampire killer Edgar Frog, of course! And as fans of The Lost Boys will know, Feldman delved into the role at full throttle. In order to get into character as the merciless mini-Van Helsing, he spent hours watching action movies starring Hollywood tough guys like Sylvester Stallone.

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Sadly, while Feldman does have fond memories of working on The Lost Boys, the production wasn’t without its downsides. During filming, for instance, the then-14-year-old actor was routinely using drugs. And his on-set intoxication forced Schumacher to step in with some stern advice. In 2020 Feldman explained on Twitter, “He tried to prevent my descent.”

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Sadly, Feldman’s vices would end up hurting his film career. In recent times, the star is perhaps better known for his bizarre rebranding as a pop star and for an infamously strange 2017 performance on The Today Show than his acting. More alarmingly, he has repeatedly made allegations that he was abused as a child by older Hollywood figures.

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To this day, Feldman continues to look back at his time on the Lost Boys set with mixed feelings. Yet it definitely wasn’t all bad. Although the movie’s production coincided with a difficult time in his life, the actor remains proud of what he accomplished on screen. He revealed on The Lost Boys: An Introspective, “Just because I had a hard time getting through it doesn’t mean that it wasn’t worth it.” Amen to that.

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